The public's voice for Hanford cleanup, clean energy, and nuclear safety across the Northwest

Image courtesy of the Hanford Advisory Board

"We began as an alliance of affected peoples, organizers, health workers, and scientists who wanted to take on a military complex that was poisoning communities, wasting billions of our money, and putting the world at risk. ANA supports our over 30 member organizations and groups who are working throughout the country to empower citizens to take action and to protest an opaque and mismanaged nuclear complex....We work to find solutions that can achieve a vision of a modern society that runs off renewable energy sources, has verifiably dismantled the world's nuclear arsenal, and has responsibly disposed of our nuclear waste." 


Taken from the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability's website. Click here to learn more! 

"We began as an alliance of affected peoples, organizers, health workers, and scientists who wanted to take on a military complex that was poisoning communities, wasting billions of our money, and putting the world at risk. ANA supports our over 30 member organizations and groups who are working throughout the country to empower citizens to take action and to protest an opaque and mismanaged nuclear complex....We work to find solutions that can achieve a vision of a modern society that runs off renewable energy sources, has verifiably dismantled the world's nuclear arsenal, and has responsibly disposed of our nuclear waste." 


Taken from the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability's website. Click here to learn more! 

Image courtesy of the Hanford Advisory Board

Map of all US Department of Energy (USDOE) nuclear waste and contaminated nuclear weapons production sites.


"We began as an alliance of affected peoples, organizers, health workers, and scientists who wanted to take on a military complex that was poisoning communities, wasting billions of our money, and putting the world at risk. ANA supports our over 30 member organizations and groups who are working throughout the country to empower citizens to take action and to protest an opaque and mismanaged nuclear complex....We work to find solutions that can achieve a vision of a modern society that runs off renewable energy sources, has verifiably dismantled the world's nuclear arsenal, and has responsibly disposed of our nuclear waste." 


Taken from the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability's website. Click here to learn more! 

Type your paragraph here.

The Hanford Advisory Board is a non-partisan and broadly representative body consisting of a balanced mix of the diverse interests that are affected by Hanford cleanup issues. As set forth in its charter, the primary mission of the Board is to provide informed recommendations and advice to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) on selected major policy issues related to the cleanup of the Hanford site.  Heart of America Northwest is one of five regional public interest groups on the Board. We have been "issue managers and lead in developing much of the Board's advice on cleanup budgets, risks and objecting to cleanup delays.

KING TV's Susannah Frame

KING TV's AWARD Winning series

"Hanford's Dirty secrets":

Susannah Frame, investigative reporter for KING TV (NBC affiliate Seattle Channel 5), has been covering the cover-up of the leaks from High-Level Nuclear Waste Tank AY-102 since 2011. Her coverage includes research from Heart of America Northwest and our pressing Washington State to enforce the federal and state hazardous waste laws which are supposed to require that leaking tanks are promptly emptied and workers are protected from toxic waste chemical vapors which "burp" from the tanks. The series includes heart breaking documentation of the suffering of workers exposed to those tank vapors.


Dr. Edwin Lyman of the Union of Concerned Scientists


The nuclear disaster at Fukushima continues to unfold 5 years after that fateful day, March 11, 2011. The lives and livelihoods of tens of thousands of Japanese have been irreparably harmed with devastating human, economic, and environmental consequences. Here in the United States, what lessons have we heeded from this disaster? What are U.S. regulators doing to better protect the hundreds of millions of Americans who live near one of the nation’s 100 operating nuclear reactors, including the Columbia Generating Station (CGS) in Washington State? What are some of the known risks at CGS and what is being done to address them? And what is the future of nuclear power in the Northwest in the face of global warming? Should citizens support the development of new small modular reactors being developed by Corvallis-based NuScale?

Lyman's Book "Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster" is available for purchase on Amazon

More Resources